Scarborough Castle 100 Years War

Mock castle lower than Scarborough Castle

Mock castle lower than Scarborough Castle

Scarborough Castle 100 Years War

At the time of the Hundred Years War (1337–1453), Scarborough was an important port for the wool trade, so was attacked several times by enemy forces.  With rumours of a French invasion, a 1393 inquiry into the state of the castle led to repairs being carried out in 1396 and 1400.

Henry VI (reigned 1422–1461; 1470–1471) ordered major repairs between 1424 and 1429.

Richard III (reigned 1483–1485) was the last monarch to enter its grounds.  He resided at the castle in 1484 while forming a fleet to fight the Tudors, a struggle he lost along with his life the following year.

Mock castle lower than Scarborough Castle

Mock castle lower than Scarborough Castle

After assaults by forces from France and Scotland in the early 16th century, in 1536 Robert Aske unsuccessfully tried to take the castle during the Pilgrimage of Grace, a revolt against the Dissolution of the Monasteries and Henry VIII’s (reigned 1509–1547) break with the Roman Catholic Church.  Repairs were made in 1537, and in 1538 some of the lead of the towers was used by the keeper, Sir Ralph Eure (Evers), to make a brewing vessel.  Eure reported that some of the walls had fallen down.

In 1557, forces loyal to Thomas Wyatt the younger, who opposed Mary I (reigned 1553–1558) and Catholicism, took the castle by entering disguised as peasants.  Their leader, Thomas Stafford, held the castle for three days, and was subsequently executed for high treason on Tower Hill.