Scarborough Castle Further Years

Scarborough Castle Drawbridge

Scarborough Castle Drawbridge

Scarborough Castle Further Years

The castle was used as a prison from the 1650s, and the garrison increased in 1658, and in 1662 it returned to the Crown.  George Fox (1624–1691), founder of the Religious Society of Friends was imprisoned there from April 1665 to September 1666 for religious activities viewed as troublesome for Charles II (reigned 1660–1685).

The castle declined again.  James II (reigned 1686–1688) did not garrison it, he gambled that its defences would be sufficient to resist any Dutch invasion, but the town was seized for William of Orange during the Glorious Revolution that ousted James.

Scarborough Castle Drawbridge  Arch

Scarborough Castle Drawbridge Arch

The Jacobite Rebellion of 1745, a series of uprising aimed at restoring the Catholic House of Stuart to the throne, saw the castle refortified with gun batteries and barracks for 120 officers and men by 1746.  The keep was used as a powder magazine, storing gunpowder, and the South Steel Battery was rebuilt.  A barracks, containing twelve apartments accommodated 120 soldiers.  Three batteries were built to protect the town and harbour. Two faced south and the other was on the north side of the castle yard.  In 1748, the Master Gunner’s house was constructed and served as accommodation until the early 20th century and today hosts the exhibition on the castle.  Scarborough Castle saw no action during this time.  Later still, the threat of French invasion during the Napoleonic Wars led to the permanent establishment of a garrison, which remained until the mid-19th century, French prisoners were held at the castle during 1796.